Resident Spotlight - Ask Betsy

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

When I was a little girl, people always told me I seemed so grown up for my age. Back then, I didn’t know what they meant. Even today I’m not so sure if I do. But I guess my wisdom has grown faster than my years, which is why here at Atrium Senior Living of Princeton, people like to come to me with their problems.

When Atrium approached me about my own Ann Landers-style column, I was hesitant. I rarely use the computer—and when I do, it’s never for advice. But it seems like that’s the way the wind is blowing these days. Life is on screen. And for the first time in my life, I’m finding myself playing wise below my years.

Enough of my gum flapping. Let’s get to it.

  • Dear Betsy,

    I’ll keep this simple: I would love to see my grandchildren more often. My son and daughter-in-law are great about visiting, but they always find a reason to leave the kids with a sitter or a neighbor. They may think I’d view them as an imposition, considering I’m not as quick as I used to be. Should I approach them about this, or just stay quiet and hope for the best?

    Sincerely,

    Nettled Nana

     

    The answer to this one’s as old as time, Nana. Or at least as old as marriage. Have you just tried talking about it? The same rule applies to husbands & wives as parents & children: Be honest, be open and be courteous. I’m sure if you asked your son why he’s not bringing the grandkids along, he’d open his eyes. Or at least give you an explanation you hadn’t considered.

  • Dear Betsy,

    I love it here at Atrium. I’ve got everything I need, and a community of people who support me both inside and outside of these walls. But somehow, I just don’t feel fulfilled. When I still worked, I could plant my pride at the jobsite. But now, I’m having trouble keeping my mind – and more importantly, my soul – occupied. Any advice from your experience?

    Sincerely,

    Poor Ol’ Pappy

     

    I think it starts with your nom de plume, Pappy. In my experience, the minute you decide you’re “Poor Ol’ Pappy,” you’re officially “Poor Ol’ Pappy.” What I mean to say is that fulfillment is as much elbow grease as it is purpose. Think about the hours you put into your job, and the satisfaction you took from that. Now just replace that job with, well—you name it. Gardening, woodwork, painting—it’s all here on campus. It doesn’t matter what you’re working toward, just find something to work toward and dig in. I promise you’ll start feeling better.

Talk to you soon, friends. Hope any of that helped. I’ll try to keep this updated regularly. But if I miss a column, take some more advice from me: Go outside. Get some air. And get off this darn machine.

- Betsy

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